Lemania Monopusher Royal Navy Fleet Arm Broad Arrow pheon H.S^ 9 4192 Tritium

Lemania Monopusher Royal Navy Fleet Arm Broad Arrow pheon H.S^ 9 4192 Tritium

3,495.00
Lemania H.S.^9 0552/924/-3305 H.S.^9 4192 Military Air Arms watch One Year warranty The movement has wear and some scratches and has been serviced before we obtained the watch which keeps good time The watch has good timekeeping with all functions operating Movement Calibre 15 CHT Inner case back marks and stamps - Acier Inoxydable The watch has been serviced at our workshop in the argyll Arcade glasgow The watch will come in a good quality box not original with a one year warranty document the dial being black is very collectable with the broad arrow pheon tritium T Circle clearly marked Three hands hour chronograph recorder with Two Hand Subsidiary hands seconds recorder and 30 minute recorder Crown and pusher - Both the crown and the pusher are operational but have some light wear both are holding firm and secure Case back - Military serial nos with raised edge key opening recesses with screw on threads fixed on the case back o ring which is designed for holding water out but we cannot guarantee a watch of this age against water perpetration even though the watch will be splash resisting Lemania, established in 1884 by Alfred Lugrin, is perhaps one of the most recognisable names in the history of wrist chronographs. At Jaeger-LeCoultre and at his own manufacture, which he ran under his own name, Lugrin gained a reputation for expertise and the soundness of his èbauches, particularly chronographs. After his death, it was under his son-in-law Maurice Meylan's leadership that the manufacture was renamed Lemania and moved to L'Orient. In 1932, Lemania joined Omega and Tissot to form SSIH (Société Suisse pour l’Industrie Horlogére SA). It was this relationship--particularly with Omega--that would result in the creation of some of the most iconic calibres in horological history, like the Lemania 1873 (or Omega Caliber .861) found in the legendary Omega Speedmaster. Like many manufactures, Lemania also equipped watches to the world's militaries, including those of Sweden, South Africa, and the United Kingdom. For many collectors, they encapsulate the essence of "tool watch" in their most elemental form--if for no other reason than that they were built to be issued to sailors, soldiers, and airmen and brought into some of the harshest environments possible. Their stark, no-frills designs were universally practical and rugged, intended for maximum utility. Within the range of military-issued timepieces, aviator's chronographs are among the most desirable, with some--like the Zenith A. Cairelli--becoming nothing short of legendary. Starting in the 1950s, Lemania issued a monopusher chronograph to the armed forces of the United Kingdom. These watches were initially issued to navigators in the Royal Air Force and later to sailors and submariners in the Royal Navy. Those issued to the Royal Navy were stamped "0552/920-3305" and were issued between 1945 and 1976. These watches are powered by robust 17 jewel Lemania èbauches and originally had radium dials, which were swapped out for tritium dials in the 1960s when the Ministry of Defense deemed the former to be too hazardous. Ours dates from this period, as it has the tell-tale T in a circle that denotes that dial has been exchanged for Tritium. Some of these contract re-dials were done rather poorly; however, ours doesn't suffer that fate, and retains its crisp printing, with the tritium aging to a handsome patina. Rare and highly collectible Lemania Fleet Air Arm chronograph Series II military watch c.1950. These fabulous watches were issued to pilots and navigators of the Royal Air Force and the Royal Navy’s Fleet Air Arm between 1945 and 1970. These beautiful chronographs were issued in three series. The watch for sale is a Lemania series II example which dates it from around 1950 to 1955 and was issued to the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm. This is indicated by the NATO stock number of 0552/924-3305 on the reverse of the case. The series II examples all had a round case with mostly black dials and featured the 15 CHT non-shock-protected movement. The circled “T” printed on the dial indicates the use of tritium luminous compound. By the early 1950’s tritium luminous compound began being used by the MOD as a substitute for radium which was considered to be more hazardous when the watches were stock piled in large quantities. The single button on the side of the watch operates the chronograph (stop-watch) function. When the button is pushed it starts the centre second hand. Pressing the button again stops the hand and pressing it a third time resets the hand back to the twelve o’clock position. There is an elapsed minute counter, which allows for timing intervals up to 30 minutes. Sadly, the Lemania watch company is no longer in existence but it has become something of a cult brand in recent years and its watches are very much cherished by collectors. Lemania supplied a number of different armed forces from all over the world. Their movements are extremely well made and are renowned for keeping excellent time, making them a good fit for a rugged life in the services. Lemania specialised in the production of chronographs (watches with a built in stop-watch function). Chronographs are inherently complicated things to manufacture and for this reason many watch companies brought-in movements from specialists like Lemania. They supplied amongst others Omega (the movement that powered the first watch on the moon was made by Lemania), and luxury brands Vacheron Constantin and Patek Philippe. Because Lemania often supplied movements to other brands (for which they were uncredited), watches which are signed by Lemania are especially prized. Good original examples of these watches are becoming increasingly rare and hard to find. As such, the watch for sale represents an excellent opportunity to acquire a fantastic collectors piece. lemania Chronograph Monopusher
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